challenging religious privilege in public life

Stephen D. Mumford

The Catholic Church's preoccupation with power stems from some of the most sensitive and important social issues of our day.

In 1931, Spain became the Republic of Spain, a liberal democracy. The Vatican feared for the Church’s very survival in Spain.

Every year since 1975 has witnessed a diminishing commitment of the United States to both domestic and world population growth control.

The Vatican acts in part, often soundlessly and most effectively, through secret organisations such as Opus Dei and the Knights of Malta.

The Vatican believes that if the solutions to the population problem are applied, the dominance of Vatican power will soon wither.

The dogma of infallibility is important to the Catholic Church because it shields the entire doctrinal structure of the Church from criticism.

Through the Vatican’s constant presentation of the Church’s actions as “virtuous”, recognition of the Church as a tyrant has been thwarted.

Because the Catholic Church ignores the principle of separation of church and state, it is the most divisive force in America.

The solutions to the problem of overpopulation threaten the continued existence of the church as it has evolved over the past 2000 years.

The Vatican is successfully blocking consideration of the reality that popu­lation growth is the most serious threat to the security of all nations.