challenging religious privilege in public life

Among the many disruptive forces that the Fourth Industrial Revolution promises to unleash is a revolution in healthcare.

Where we’re heading: an evolutionary transition on a scale like the planet experienced from early hominids 2 million years ago to us today.

There’s no grand plan and no reason why nature shouldn’t, like the rest of us, occasionally make terrible mistakes.

When I mention to an audience that the first person to live to 200 has already been born – it gets quite the reaction.

Billions of dollars have been poured into three areas of research: neuroprosthetics, brain-computer interfaces and optogenetics.

We are entering a very transformative period in history – one that could someday be viewed as the MOST transformative.

AI will be the pivotal technology in achieving this progress. We have a moral imperative to realize this promise while controlling the peril.

The final frontier of digital technology is integrating into your own brain. DARPA wants to go there. Scientists want to go there.

Alvin Toffler was right, continuous learning is the hallmark of our future as humans – but to relearn, we must unlearn.

Considering aging a disease or a medical condition is actually important because at stake is government approval for anti-aging drug trials.