challenging religious privilege in public life

There are at least 4,200 religions in the world today. It’s obvious there’s a 0% chance all of them are the true word of God.

There’s no grand plan and no reason why nature shouldn’t, like the rest of us, occasionally make terrible mistakes.

According to Amnesty International, the US Conference of Catholic Bishops intend to ban all abortion and birth control.

Considering aging a disease or a medical condition is actually important because at stake is government approval for anti-aging drug trials.

There is little reluctance to consider implants for somebody who is paralysed or has lost a limb. So what about implants in normal people?

The main problem with any religious answer to the question of the meaning of life is that, in general, religious beliefs are probably false.

The pro-life arguments fail, primarily because the fetus satisfies few if any of the necessary and sufficient conditions for personhood.

We are getting better at thinking about religion, individually and socially. Compared to centuries past, more people now know how to think.

Fundamentalist Christianity is anti-modern. It holds that truth became manifest two thousand years ago, and everything since is of no consequence.

It’s not a good idea to remain silent or to allow ourselves to be intimidated by aggressive Christian infringements on the public sector.