Scientists turn the clock back on human skin cells by 30 years

26 April 2022

The astonishing research could lead to development of techniques that will stave off diseases of old age. (Credit: YouTube / screengrab)

Research from the Babraham Institute has succeeded in turning back the clock on human skin cells by 30 years, opening the door to a revolution in regenerative medicine. The researchers restored youthful function to the old cells. The findings could lead to targeted approaches to treat age-related problems.

The Guardian reports:

People could eventually be able to turn the clock back on the cell-ageing process by 30 years, according to researchers who have developed a technique for reprogramming skin cells to behave as if they are much younger.

Research from the Babraham Institute, a life sciences research organisation in Cambridge, could lead to the development of techniques that will stave off the diseases of old age by restoring the function of older cells and reducing their biological age.

In experiments simulating a skin wound, older cells were exposed to a concoction of chemicals that “reprogrammed” them to behave more like youthful cells and removed age-related changes.

Dr. Diljeet Gill, a researcher at the Babraham Institute, said: “Our understanding of ageing on a molecular level has progressed over the last decade, giving rise to techniques that allow researchers to measure age-related biological changes in human cells. We were able to apply this to our experiment to determine the extent of reprogramming our new method achieved. Our results represent a big step forward in our understanding of cell reprogramming.”

The findings were reported in eLife, in a paper titled, “Multi-omic rejuvenation of human cells by maturation phase transient reprogramming”.

Science rejuvenates woman’s skin cells to 30 years younger – BBC News

Babraham Institute – Helping to turn back the ageing clock

The Science of Slowing Down Aging | WIRED

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